Plan9 Music

'Kills Me' is the debut album from Chris Monaghan - a confusing alter-ego for a constantly changing group of musicians under the baton of multi instrumentalist Mike Grubb. A live act until now, Chris Monaghan was playing shows as far back as 2000 in Washington, DC. Since then it has gone through several lineup changes, with Mike Grubb recording the whole of 'Kills Me' on his own. Despite the revolving door of musicians and myriad of styles, Kills Me is a surprisingly cohesive album, with classic songwriting and in your face guitars being the glue that holds the wide range of styles together. The opening track, 'Shoobee' gives a tip of the hat to Chet Atkins with it's jazzy progression until it is cut off by 'Such is Life,' a great slice of melodic punk rock. 'Wanna Seeya's soul-inspired sound gives way to the thick, heavy guitar of 'Where's Daisy'. The two stand out cuts, '19 days,' a flash back to the huge wall of sound a la Phil Spector, and the title track, a ballad the truly rocks without sounding cheesy, both share great melodies, danceable rhythm, and very distinct sounds. Throughout this record, the songs contrast but compliment each other, not unlike a memorable dinner. I could write a page on each song, but in the interest of brevity, this is an album worth checking out. Sonically, it is not a glossy studio production by any means (the majority was recorded at Grubb's home studio), but the tunes are there, and as they get stuck in your head, you can't help but hum along. -Mark Stevens Richmond Music journal.
'Kills Me' is the debut album from Chris Monaghan - a confusing alter-ego for a constantly changing group of musicians under the baton of multi instrumentalist Mike Grubb. A live act until now, Chris Monaghan was playing shows as far back as 2000 in Washington, DC. Since then it has gone through several lineup changes, with Mike Grubb recording the whole of 'Kills Me' on his own. Despite the revolving door of musicians and myriad of styles, Kills Me is a surprisingly cohesive album, with classic songwriting and in your face guitars being the glue that holds the wide range of styles together. The opening track, 'Shoobee' gives a tip of the hat to Chet Atkins with it's jazzy progression until it is cut off by 'Such is Life,' a great slice of melodic punk rock. 'Wanna Seeya's soul-inspired sound gives way to the thick, heavy guitar of 'Where's Daisy'. The two stand out cuts, '19 days,' a flash back to the huge wall of sound a la Phil Spector, and the title track, a ballad the truly rocks without sounding cheesy, both share great melodies, danceable rhythm, and very distinct sounds. Throughout this record, the songs contrast but compliment each other, not unlike a memorable dinner. I could write a page on each song, but in the interest of brevity, this is an album worth checking out. Sonically, it is not a glossy studio production by any means (the majority was recorded at Grubb's home studio), but the tunes are there, and as they get stuck in your head, you can't help but hum along. -Mark Stevens Richmond Music journal.
844553018422
Chris Monaghan - Kills Me

Details

Format: CD
Label: CDB
Catalog: 0348792
Rel. Date: 09/29/2009
UPC: 844553018422

Kills Me
Artist: Chris Monaghan
Format: CD
New: In Store $7.99
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Shoobee
2. Such Is Life
3. Wanna Seeya
4. Where's Daisy?
5. Sunday Morning Is Killing Me
6. 19 Days
7. Kills Me
8. Overdrive
9. Princess 1
10. A Careful Politic 1
11. Go to Hell

More Info:

'Kills Me' is the debut album from Chris Monaghan - a confusing alter-ego for a constantly changing group of musicians under the baton of multi instrumentalist Mike Grubb. A live act until now, Chris Monaghan was playing shows as far back as 2000 in Washington, DC. Since then it has gone through several lineup changes, with Mike Grubb recording the whole of 'Kills Me' on his own. Despite the revolving door of musicians and myriad of styles, Kills Me is a surprisingly cohesive album, with classic songwriting and in your face guitars being the glue that holds the wide range of styles together. The opening track, 'Shoobee' gives a tip of the hat to Chet Atkins with it's jazzy progression until it is cut off by 'Such is Life,' a great slice of melodic punk rock. 'Wanna Seeya's soul-inspired sound gives way to the thick, heavy guitar of 'Where's Daisy'. The two stand out cuts, '19 days,' a flash back to the huge wall of sound a la Phil Spector, and the title track, a ballad the truly rocks without sounding cheesy, both share great melodies, danceable rhythm, and very distinct sounds. Throughout this record, the songs contrast but compliment each other, not unlike a memorable dinner. I could write a page on each song, but in the interest of brevity, this is an album worth checking out. Sonically, it is not a glossy studio production by any means (the majority was recorded at Grubb's home studio), but the tunes are there, and as they get stuck in your head, you can't help but hum along. -Mark Stevens Richmond Music journal.
        
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