A must-see for all silent cinema fans, Shooting Stars (1928) is a brilliant and assured debut from Anthony Asquith (the on-screen credit goes to A.V. Bramble), and offers a fascinating insight into the workings of a 1920s London film studio. Boasting a boldly Expressionist shooting style, dramatic lighting and great performances from it's leads (Annette Benson, Brian Aherne and Donald Calthrop), Shooting Stars is a sophisticated, modern morality tale, while also offering an affectionate critique of the film industry and a celebration of it's possibilities. It teases the audience with it's revelations of how the illusions of the world of filmmaking conceal irony and hidden truths.
A must-see for all silent cinema fans, Shooting Stars (1928) is a brilliant and assured debut from Anthony Asquith (the on-screen credit goes to A.V. Bramble), and offers a fascinating insight into the workings of a 1920s London film studio. Boasting a boldly Expressionist shooting style, dramatic lighting and great performances from it's leads (Annette Benson, Brian Aherne and Donald Calthrop), Shooting Stars is a sophisticated, modern morality tale, while also offering an affectionate critique of the film industry and a celebration of it's possibilities. It teases the audience with it's revelations of how the illusions of the world of filmmaking conceal irony and hidden truths.
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Shooting Stars (1928)
Format: DVD
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A must-see for all silent cinema fans, Shooting Stars (1928) is a brilliant and assured debut from Anthony Asquith (the on-screen credit goes to A.V. Bramble), and offers a fascinating insight into the workings of a 1920s London film studio. Boasting a boldly Expressionist shooting style, dramatic lighting and great performances from it's leads (Annette Benson, Brian Aherne and Donald Calthrop), Shooting Stars is a sophisticated, modern morality tale, while also offering an affectionate critique of the film industry and a celebration of it's possibilities. It teases the audience with it's revelations of how the illusions of the world of filmmaking conceal irony and hidden truths.