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Formerly bitter enemies, Marley Marl produced one of the biggest diss tracks against KRS-One, igniting the first full-scale hip-hop battle in history between the two boroughs of New York City. This collaboration never should have happened. But 20 years later, Marley Marl and KRS-One have put aside all differences for Hip-Hop Lives, a masterpiece of production and lyricism from begininning to end.
Formerly bitter enemies, Marley Marl produced one of the biggest diss tracks against KRS-One, igniting the first full-scale hip-hop battle in history between the two boroughs of New York City. This collaboration never should have happened. But 20 years later, Marley Marl and KRS-One have put aside all differences for Hip-Hop Lives, a masterpiece of production and lyricism from begininning to end.
099923410522

Details

Format: CD
Label: KOCH RECORDS
Catalog: 4105
Rel. Date: 05/22/2007
UPC: 099923410522

With Marley Marl
Artist: KRS-ONE
Format: CD
New: Not on Hand, Let us see if we can get it for you!
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Formerly bitter enemies, Marley Marl produced one of the biggest diss tracks against KRS-One, igniting the first full-scale hip-hop battle in history between the two boroughs of New York City. This collaboration never should have happened. But 20 years later, Marley Marl and KRS-One have put aside all differences for Hip-Hop Lives, a masterpiece of production and lyricism from begininning to end.

Reviews:

"What's the matter with your DJ, MC Shan? On the wheels of steel, Marlon sucks." Twenty years ago, KRS-One and Boogie Down Productions ignited a dis war that would go down as one of hip-hop's greatest rivalries'"all over a misunderstanding. "The Bridge" by Marley Marl and MC Shan seemed to say that hip-hop originated in Queens, and the South Bronx wasn't having it. KRS fired back with "The Bridge Is Over" and it was on, with Shan and KRS trading disses up until 1990. Eventually, some other Bronx and Queensbridge crews took sides and joined the battle with their own dis tracks. Now, Bronx hip-hop pioneers Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five are in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but the "Bridge War" had already made it clear to everyone that the Bronx was the birthplace. That's why a collaboration between KRS-One and Marley Marl is significant. Both have been outspoken about keeping hip-hop rooted in its original principles. On Hip-Hop Lives, Marley Marl's production style hasn't been updated for 2007, and KRS still writes politically-charged rhymes like "Kill a Rapper," about the unsolved murders of several hip-hop stars. KRS and MC Shan already appeared together in a commercial a few years back, but the release of Hip-Hop Lives means that two decades later, the Bridge War is officially over.

 

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